Top Five Questions Founders Ask – Part 4

By on in Everything Else, Partner Interviews

As a full-service software consultancy, we at Carbon Five get lots of questions from clients past, present, and future. We’re passionate about sharing our industry knowledge, so we sat down with our leadership team and got some advice for aspiring founders and product leaders as part of an ongoing 6-part series. You can see all the interviews here.

Here in part four, we asked Partner and Director of Design David Hendee to talk to us about costs, operations and the big brand.

Should I work with an outside design agency? Do I need a branding firm?

Carbon Five is an action-oriented consultancy. We are passionate about putting product into market, not just having great ideas. The question does come up: how much design do I need to get started with Carbon Five? The real answer is none. You can come with just an idea. On day one, we’ll talk about the people your product solves a problem for, what you think the problem is, and how you think you’re going to solve it. That’s a great starting point for working with us, because we can do both design and the first version of your brand. Our clients work with our in-house designers, but sometimes we’ll partner with outside agencies, which can be great as well.

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More important, I think is do you have a team that can solve a problem and has the grit and wherewithal to take the money and actually do something effective with it?

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Top Five Questions Founders Ask – Part 3

By on in Everything Else, Partner Interviews, Process, Startups

As a full-stack software consultancy, we at Carbon Five get lots of questions from clients past, present, and future. We’re passionate about sharing our industry knowledge, so we sat down with our leadership team and got some advice for aspiring founders and product leaders as part of an ongoing 6-part series. You can see all the interviews here.

Here, we sat down with Courtney Hemphill, partner and technical lead, to give us some insight into keeping your startup lean and functioning smoothly.

How can I find great developers to hire?

There are a couple things that I’m seeing right now that I feel like are smart plays to finding great developers. I think great developers are not people that are created in 12 weeks at a Bootcamp, I think they’re people who are really interested in solving problems, and they’ve just found that their modus operandi for solving problems happens to be in code. The equivalent holds true for design. They’re just solving problems through a visual experience versus code. Finding those people is what you want to do. That doesn’t really answer the question though so I would say that code languages are something that people get really interested in. Meaning that new languages are coming out and each of those languages can solve specific problems. Courtney Hemphill

I think great developers are not people that are created in 12 weeks at a Bootcamp, I think they’re people who are really interested in solving problems, and they’ve just found that their modus operandi for solving problems happens to be in code. The equivalent holds true for design. They’re just solving problems through a visual experience versus code.

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Top Five Questions Founders Ask – Part 2

By on in Partner Interviews, Product Management, Startups

As a full-stack software consultancy, we at Carbon Five get lots of questions from clients past, present, and future. We’re passionate about sharing our industry knowledge, so we sat down with our leadership team and got some advice for aspiring founders and product leaders as part of an ongoing 6-part series. You can see all the interviews here.

How healthy is my codebase? Can I rewrite it, or can it be nursed back to health?

A hundred percent of the time, your codebase can be nursed back to health. In my experience, ninety-five percent of the time, that’s the path you should take. This is making one assumption, that there’s a product already built and in use. The bigger the codebase, and the longer it’s lived, the more likely that it has features or bugs or whatever, pieces of code that are in use, that people are relying on, but nobody knows about at the company. So whenever you talk about rewriting a codebase to be the same as an existing codebase, you are opening yourself up for a world of pain because it’s very likely that there’s nobody in the world that exists who knows all of the requirements. If you ever decide to rewrite a codebase, you have to start from first principles and say, “We have to start from the very beginning and define what this new product does, and as a basis, we’re going to use this old product, and we’re going to say this is our starting point.” The same way if a client came to us with wire frames and said, “This is what I want,” we’d say, “Well, we’re going to use this as a starting point, but we’re still going to go through our personas exercise, and our experience map, and our story mapping, and our story writing, because we need to understand all that in order to build this product.” If you can do it that way, then rewriting is actually completely doable. I’ve discovered that even though it can be a lot of work to nurse a codebase back to health, if the functionality is there and fulfilling the needs of the users, then to continue to fulfill the need of the users without any interruption, you gotta nurse it back to health.

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A hundred percent of the time, your codebase can be nursed back to health. In my experience, ninety-five percent of the time, that’s the path you should take. This is making one assumption, that there’s a product already built and in use.

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Top Five Questions Founders Ask – Part 1

By on in Partner Interviews, Product Management, Startups

As a full-service software consultancy, we at Carbon Five get lots of questions from clients past, present, and future. We’re passionate about sharing our industry knowledge, so we sat down with our leadership team and got some advice for aspiring founders and product leaders as part of an ongoing 6-part series. You can see all the interviews here.

First up are some practical answers from Partner and COO Don Thompson on lessons learned from 15+ years of collaboration on client-driven technical projects and insights into how Carbon Five’s process enables companies of all sizes.

When do I build my internal team?

Beginning day one is our preference. The happiest clients are the ones that have a team in place to take over before we’re done. It doesn’t have to be a CTO–that can simply be a junior developer. It can be a struggle for clients to make a junior hire if they have more confidence putting a senior person in place. They feel a Director or VP will have more confidence in some of the decisions they’re making early on, and can build out their own team. From our standpoint, either approach can be successful.

Where do I find my talent, and how do I attract them?

That is really tough. The early hires will often establish and shape a corporate culture so it is important to get it right. In addition to the roles to hire for, we encourage our clients to consider making diversity a hiring goal. Creating a balanced, inclusive team takes more time and effort than most company founders expect. When our clients do begin to ramp up hiring, we’re happy to help with writing a job rec and shaping a job description. We’re happy to help review resumes. We’re happy to interview people and really be that advocate for our client as far as where people can fit into the organization. We’re happy to give them desk space once they’re hired. We have a recruiter, and we’re happy to make introductions to on the behalf of our client.  While we still encourage people to reach out to their own networks, remember to reach out well beyond it. Don

In addition to the roles to hire for, we encourage our clients to consider making diversity a hiring goal. Creating a balanced, inclusive team takes more time and effort than most company founders expect…while we still encourage people to reach out to their own networks, remember to reach out well beyond it.

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