Articles on networking

Rudy Jahchan

Rudy Jahchan

vimtronner: A Multiplayer, Command-line vim Trainer Built on Node.js and Socket.io

Greetings, programs! Meet vimtronner, a multiplayer command-line game that teaches you the core vim keys. Be the last player alive by either controlling your bike safely around obstacles or building your own walls for your opponents to crash into. Just remember: you can’t do both at the same time! You can learn how to install

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

iOS Integration Tests with Kiwi

I have been using Kiwi to run my iOS projects’ tests. Kiwi works great for defining BDD style unit tests which express the sort of nested assertions I like to write. Unit tests should test code in isolation so that they remain small, fast, and stable. So my unit tests mock or stub any network

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

iPhone Distributed Computing Fallacy #8: the network is homogeneous

Reviewing the 8 classic “fallacies of distributed computing” and how we can avoid them when writing iOS applications. The fallacies of distributed computing The network is reliable. Latency is zero. Bandwidth is infinite. The network is secure. Topology doesn’t change. There is one administrator. Transport cost is zero. The network is homogeneous. Fallacy #8: “the

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

iPhone Distributed Computing Fallacy #7: transport cost is zero

Reviewing the 8 classic “fallacies of distributed computing” and how we can avoid them when writing iOS applications. The fallacies of distributed computing The network is reliable. Latency is zero. Bandwidth is infinite. The network is secure. Topology doesn’t change. There is one administrator. Transport cost is zero. The network is homogeneous.

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

iPhone Distributed Computing Fallacy #6: there is one administrator

Reviewing the 8 classic “fallacies of distributed computing” and how we can avoid them when writing iOS applications. The fallacies of distributed computing The network is reliable. Latency is zero. Bandwidth is infinite. The network is secure. Topology doesn’t change. There is one administrator. Transport cost is zero. The network is homogeneous.

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

iPhone Distributed Computing Fallacy #5: topology doesn’t change

Reviewing the 8 classic “fallacies of distributed computing” and how we can avoid them when writing iOS applications. The fallacies of distributed computing The network is reliable. Latency is zero. Bandwidth is infinite. The network is secure. Topology doesn’t change. There is one administrator. Transport cost is zero. The network is homogeneous.

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

iPhone Distributed Computing Fallacy #4: the network is secure

Reviewing the 8 classic “fallacies of distributed computing” and how we can avoid them when writing iOS applications. The fallacies of distributed computing The network is reliable. Latency is zero. Bandwidth is infinite. The network is secure. Topology doesn’t change. There is one administrator. Transport cost is zero. The network is homogeneous.

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

iPhone Distributed Computing Fallacy #3: bandwidth is infinite

Reviewing the 8 classic “fallacies of distributed computing” and how we can avoid them when writing iOS applications. The fallacies of distributed computing The network is reliable. Latency is zero. Bandwidth is infinite. The network is secure. Topology doesn’t change. There is one administrator. Transport cost is zero. The network is homogeneous.

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

iPhone Distributed Computing Fallacy #2: latency is zero

Reviewing the 8 classic “fallacies of distributed computing” and how we can avoid them when writing iOS applications. The fallacies of distributed computing The network is reliable. Latency is zero. Bandwidth is infinite. The network is secure. Topology doesn’t change. There is one administrator. Transport cost is zero. The network is homogeneous.

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

iPhone Distributed Computing Fallacy #1: the network is reliable

As iPhone and web developers we have a number of useful abstractions available for working with network requests. Unfortunately none of them can actually spare us from needing to consider the realities of an unreliable network, especially when working with mobile devices. Fortunately with a little foresight and a few good patterns we can build

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