Taking Elm for a Test Drive

By on in Development, JavaScript

Elm emerged on the scene in early 2012 as a strongly-typed, functional language that compiles down to Javascript. With its architecture and type system, it claims to provide bulletproof guardrails to help developers build systems that are highly reliable, with “no runtime exceptions in practice”.

Elm prides itself on having a low barrier of entry – it can be introduced as a component into an existing web app, so long as your app can provide it a self-contained div. In fact, the creators of Elm strongly advocate taking an incremental approach to introducing Elm into your systems.

Lately, a few Carbon Fivers and I have been taking the language out for a spin and discovering what it means to write software systems in Elm. In this post, we’ll walk through what it looks like to take a small form widget written in vanilla jQuery and convert it to Elm, picking up language basics and learning to write apps the Elm way. We’ll also discuss the unique feature set that makes Elm apps so reliable.

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Setting up React Native build environments using NativeModules

By on in Development, Everything Else, JavaScript

React Native is an emerging platform in the mobile space that allows developers to write native apps in Javascript without having to learn Java or Swift. It’s great conceptually, but developers end up having to write NativeModules (for iOS and Android) anyway because it lacks the tools that other frameworks generally provide. In this blog post, we’ll show you how to pass your build environment from the native environment to your javascript environment. In the process, you should get a better idea of how to build simple NativeModules.

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The JavaScript Event Loop: Explained

By on in Development, JavaScript

What’s this post about?

With JavaScript approaching near-ubiquity as the scripting language of the web browser, it benefits you to have a basic understanding of its event-driven interaction model and how it differs from the request-response model typically found in languages like Ruby, Python, and Java. In this post, I’ll explain some core concepts of the JavaScript concurrency model, including its event loop and message queue in hopes of improving your understanding of a language you’re probably already writing but perhaps don’t fully understand.

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