Articles on continuous integration

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

iOS Integration Tests with Kiwi

I have been using Kiwi to run my iOS projects’ tests. Kiwi works great for defining BDD style unit tests which express the sort of nested assertions I like to write. Unit tests should test code in isolation so that they remain small, fast, and stable. So my unit tests mock or stub any network

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

Automated ad hoc builds using Xcode 4

I’ve previously discussed Continuous Integration for iPhone Projects in TeamCity using Xcode 3 and Building Xcode 4 Projects from the Command Line. Now I’ll tie those together and use TeamCity to automatically create ad hoc builds I can install over the air (directly onto a device without using iTunes) every time I check in code.

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

Generating documentation from specs

On one of our rails projects I am creating an api to allow mobile clients to access a web service. I need to provide documentation of this API to the developers of several different clients during its development. Normally I would prefer to let my API tests act as documentation of the expected API behavior

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

Running Xcode 4 unit tests from the command line

Command line builds for Xcode 4 projects are a good first step but I really want to get my project’s tests running on a continuous integration server again. Since “test” isn’t a valid build action to pass to xcodebuild I’ve been looking for a configuration which would allow me to run tests in a headless

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

Building Xcode 4 projects from the command line

The Xcode 4 developer tools introduced some changes to the xcodebuild command line tool. Instead of specifying a project and target developers can now provide a workspace and scheme to build.

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

Continuous integration for iPhone projects in TeamCity

Carbon Five has been using TeamCity as our continuous integration server for most of our recent projects, including our iPhone work. Out continuous integration environment monitors the git repository used by each project, runs the project’s tests each time a change is pushed to the repository, and can automatically produce an ad-hoc build of an

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Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

Deploying to Heroku from TeamCity

Previously I discussed our TeamCity configuration using RVM and mentioned that we often use git to deploy projects. Today I’ll share an example of how a TeamCity build agent can trigger deployments of a application hosted on Heroku and some of the challenges I found.

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

Using RVM on TeamCity build agents

We have been using TeamCity to manage the continuous integration, testing, and deployment of many of our recent projects. We have also been using RVM on all of our recent Rails projects to allow us to install multiple ruby versions and create isolated gemsets for each project. RVM proved to be particularly useful on our

Jonah Williams

Jonah Williams

Automatically deploying to Engine Yard Cloud

I’m working on a application which is deployed to Engine Yard’s Cloud infrastructure and I wanted to automatically redeploy the application whenever our tests passed on our continuous integration server. Engine Yard will eventually allow us to push a branch to our cloud environment from git (ie “git push engineyard master”) but until that is

Christian Nelson

Christian Nelson

Continuous Integration and Build Promotion

We have a build server and we practice continuous integration on all of our projects. In fact, it’s pretty much the first thing we set up after version control. We’re feedback junkies. It became especially apparent while working on a client project last year where we used their development infrastructure. They had a build server

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