Top 10 Product Mistakes Made by First Time Founders

By on in Mobile, Product Management, Startups

regrets

 

The tech scene (especially in the Bay Area) has reached a point where it’s expanded way past techies. It seems successful people from all different industries are drawn to the promise, reach, and money in tech. Doctors, bankers, artists, and even educators are launching startups and talking about MVPs. It’s definitely exciting and inspires me everyday. But, building a great product is sometimes more of an art than a science, and first time founders make common mistakes. From a company that has worked with more startups than it can count, and has seen its fair share of first time product mistakes, here are some of the most common ones to avoid.

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The 10 Practices of Healthy Engineering Teams – Part 2

By on in Culture, Development, Process, Startups

In Part 1 of this series, we introduced a high-performing engineering team at SuperStartupCorp that had automated repetitive tasks, codified its engineering practices, and adopted a learning mindset, resulting in happy engineers and happy stakeholders. Read on to learn more traits and practices that make this team so successful, and how they keep their bus factor high. (If you’re feeling extra adventurous, you can head on over to Part 3).

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Before You Build: How to Get Your Startup Off the Ground Without a Team

By on in Design, Startups

A group of people sketching

Photo from my colleague Yasmine Molavi’s sketching workshop

You’re starting a company. You’re so full of ideas that you have three PowerPoint decks! Wowza! You have a couple co-founders or maybe even an employee. If only your team had some engineers to build the product…

There are many, many important things you can do to give your product momentum before you build any software. Even if you have engineers, your team can (and should) do some of these activities in parallel to engage your audience, strengthen your product and beat out competitors. It’s important that the founders lead these activities because no one cares about the success of your company more than you.

This post covers finding customers, getting your brand and web presence started and how to get your product off the ground. The two most important things a founder can do is find their customers and establish channels for them to find you. I’ve helped to launch over forty websites and apps in my career. The ones that are successful had a growing list of interested customers (or an existing customer database) before launch. Continue reading …


Fintech Startups Continue Wall Street Transformation

By on in Announcements, Startups

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Back in 2008, I moved from Paris to New York City right as the Big Apple was in a Big Mess. I remember walking past a live air studio as a visibly flustered newscaster gestured erratically in front of an Armageddon-esque stock screen. And, I recall witnessing Barclays ascent on Lehman Brothers, encircling the iconic building in a virtual moat of town cars from which a flow of pinstriped suits scuttled.

Eight years later, I find myself back in New York and am happy to report that the financial sector is looking up again – thanks to the current wave of fintech innovation.

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Founder Five: Pete Shalek and Steve Marks from Joyable

By on in Everything Else, Startups

We’re catching up with some of the most inspiring founders we’ve worked with to share insights and advice from their experience of starting and growing businesses. Recently, we worked with the Joyable team on their iOS app, and we were inspired by their customer-focused mindset. For those who are not yet familiar, Joyable offers an online Cognitive Behavioral Therapy program to help individuals overcome social anxiety. Every decision made by Pete and Steve from the outset was validated by real consumer experience.

We also published an extended version of this interview on Medium.

1) What was the “aha moment” that motivated you to start Joyable?

Pete: I knew I wanted to do something in healthcare, and I wanted to see problems on the ground [and] do some customer development work. So I convinced some doctors at Stanford Hospital, where I was in business school, to let me shadow them. I followed doctors in the emergency room for eight hours a day. It was fascinating and really fun. As anyone who works in a hospital will tell you, there are many things that can be improved in hospitals— even at great hospitals.

That hit me really hard. This idea that someone was in bad enough shape that they went to an emergency room, and they were being told to wait three months. – Pete Shalek

PeteShalekSteveMarks

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The 10 Practices of Healthy Engineering Teams – Part 1

By on in Culture, Development, Process, Startups

Behold the engineering team at SuperStartupCorp: their steady delivery of features, humble reception of feedback and crafting of well-architected software systems earn them praise up and down the company. The team greatly enjoys working together, and consistently leaves the office feeling accomplished, empowered, and happy.

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How is this team able to consistently deliver features for the business, while maintaining morale in a changing sea of fluctuating product requirements, leadership changes, and unplanned site emergencies? It wasn’t always this way.

Read on to learn the first three steps to this team’s journey towards engineering happiness. And don’t forget to read on to Part 2 and Part 3 of this series.

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Top Five Questions Founders Ask – Part 3

By on in Everything Else, Partner Interviews, Process, Startups

As a full-stack software consultancy, we at Carbon Five get lots of questions from clients past, present, and future. We’re passionate about sharing our industry knowledge, so we sat down with our leadership team and got some advice for aspiring founders and product leaders as part of an ongoing 6-part series. You can see all the interviews here.

Here, we sat down with Courtney Hemphill, partner and technical lead, to give us some insight into keeping your startup lean and functioning smoothly.

How can I find great developers to hire?

There are a couple things that I’m seeing right now that I feel like are smart plays to finding great developers. I think great developers are not people that are created in 12 weeks at a Bootcamp, I think they’re people who are really interested in solving problems, and they’ve just found that their modus operandi for solving problems happens to be in code. The equivalent holds true for design. They’re just solving problems through a visual experience versus code. Finding those people is what you want to do. That doesn’t really answer the question though so I would say that code languages are something that people get really interested in. Meaning that new languages are coming out and each of those languages can solve specific problems. Courtney Hemphill

I think great developers are not people that are created in 12 weeks at a Bootcamp, I think they’re people who are really interested in solving problems, and they’ve just found that their modus operandi for solving problems happens to be in code. The equivalent holds true for design. They’re just solving problems through a visual experience versus code.

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Top Five Questions Founders Ask – Part 2

By on in Partner Interviews, Product Management, Startups

As a full-stack software consultancy, we at Carbon Five get lots of questions from clients past, present, and future. We’re passionate about sharing our industry knowledge, so we sat down with our leadership team and got some advice for aspiring founders and product leaders as part of an ongoing 6-part series. You can see all the interviews here.

How healthy is my codebase? Can I rewrite it, or can it be nursed back to health?

A hundred percent of the time, your codebase can be nursed back to health. In my experience, ninety-five percent of the time, that’s the path you should take. This is making one assumption, that there’s a product already built and in use. The bigger the codebase, and the longer it’s lived, the more likely that it has features or bugs or whatever, pieces of code that are in use, that people are relying on, but nobody knows about at the company. So whenever you talk about rewriting a codebase to be the same as an existing codebase, you are opening yourself up for a world of pain because it’s very likely that there’s nobody in the world that exists who knows all of the requirements. If you ever decide to rewrite a codebase, you have to start from first principles and say, “We have to start from the very beginning and define what this new product does, and as a basis, we’re going to use this old product, and we’re going to say this is our starting point.” The same way if a client came to us with wire frames and said, “This is what I want,” we’d say, “Well, we’re going to use this as a starting point, but we’re still going to go through our personas exercise, and our experience map, and our story mapping, and our story writing, because we need to understand all that in order to build this product.” If you can do it that way, then rewriting is actually completely doable. I’ve discovered that even though it can be a lot of work to nurse a codebase back to health, if the functionality is there and fulfilling the needs of the users, then to continue to fulfill the need of the users without any interruption, you gotta nurse it back to health.

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A hundred percent of the time, your codebase can be nursed back to health. In my experience, ninety-five percent of the time, that’s the path you should take. This is making one assumption, that there’s a product already built and in use.

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